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Practicing Medicine RSV Toolkit RSV Management

RSV Management

Diagnosis & management

Updates on managing patients with RSV and sequela of effects

Explore topics including development of vaccines, antivirals and monoclonal antibodies to prevent and mitigate the effects of RSV.

While most RSV infections cease on their own in a week or two, there is currently no specific treatment. Prevention of RSV has made great strides in 2023. The first RSV vaccine for individuals 60 years and older, which was approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on May 4, 2023. On Aug. 3, 2023, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved nirsevimab for the Vaccine for Children (VFC) Program, as well as providing recommended immunization guidelines using nirsevimab for infants and high-risk toddlers. Researchers continue to work on the development of vaccines, antivirals and monoclonal antibodies to prevent and mitigate the effects of RSV within age groups.

The drug called palivizumab is currently available to prevent severe RSV illness in certain infants and children who are at high risk for severe disease. This group would include infants born prematurely or with congenital heart disease or chronic lung disease. The drug can help prevent serious RSV disease from developing, but it cannot cure or treat children who are already suffering from serious RSV infection, and it cannot prevent infection with RSV. If a patient’s child is at high risk for severe RSV infection, encourage discussions between the health care team and families to assess if palivizumab can be used as a preventive measure.

Treating specific populations – fact sheets

Videos

 

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