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The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) represents more than 145,000 osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical students.

In addition to advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine, the AOA promotes public health, encourages scientific research, serves as the primary certifying body for DOs and acts as the accrediting agency for all osteopathic medical schools.

Find an expert

If you’re a member of the media working on an article about osteopathic medicine or seeking an expert source, please contact:

  • Sheridan Chaney

    Vice President, Communications
    (312) 202-8043
    Email Sheridan

  • Jessica Bardoulas

    Director, Media Relations
    (312) 202-8038
    Email Jessica

  • Jeff Brennan

    Manager, Media Relations
    (312) 202-8161
    Email Jeff


News releases

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
Researchers say dogs may help develop over-the-counter test capable of earlier detection of lung cancer.

Poll finds women 35+ would have attempted pregnancy sooner if they had known more about age-related fertility decline
Less than one-third (31%) of American adults realize age is top contributor to infertility in women, a new AOA poll finds.

Accreditation decisions for colleges of osteopathic medicine
The American Osteopathic Association’s Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) today announced accreditation decisions made at its April 25-28, 2019 meeting.

Frontline physicians support proposed vaccines act to provide funding for vaccine hesitancy surveillance
In a joint statement, the AOA supports the bipartisan Vaccine Awareness Campaign to Champion Immunization Nationally and Enhance Safety Act, which recommends federal funding for vaccine hesitancy surveillance.

Frontline physicians call on politicians to end political interference in the delivery of evidence based medicine
Health care leaders oppose efforts in state legislatures to interfere with the patient-physician relationship, and, in some cases, even criminalize physicians who deliver safe, legal, and necessary medical care.

Mayo Clinic researchers say fecal transplants show promise for treating antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Non-pharmaceutical treatment can combat recurring Clostridium difficile infections, according to an article in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

 


Osteopathic Medicine FAQ

What are DOs?

There are two types of fully licensed physicians in the US: Medical Doctors (MDs) and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (DOs). Their training and education are similar and equally rigorous, involving four years of medical school followed by specialty training in a residency program. Both types of physicians practice in every medical and surgical specialty in the United States.

Today, there are approximately 114,000 licensed and practicing osteopathic physicians in the US, which is just over 11% of the physician population. Osteopathic medicine is the fastest growing medical field in the U.S., and one in four medical students in the United States is training to be an osteopathic physician. DOs are projected to represent more than 20% of all practicing physicians by 2030.

What is the AOA?

The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) represents more than 145,000 osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical students. In addition to advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine, the AOA promotes public health, encourages scientific research, serves as the primary certifying body for DOs and acts as the accrediting agency for all osteopathic medical schools. Learn more about DOs and their unique approach to care.

What is the correct terminology?

‘Osteopathic physician’ and ‘osteopathic medicine’ are the terms to use for the DOs. ‘Osteopath’ and ‘osteopathy’ refer to foreign-trained, non-physician health care professionals.

Osteopathic physician (DO) should be used when referring to a fully licensed physician who graduated from an accredited osteopathic medical school in the United States and is qualified to prescribe medication and practice in all specialty areas including surgery. Osteopath describes a health care provider trained outside of the United States who does not qualify for licensure for the unlimited practice of medicine.

Osteopathic medicine should be used when referring to medicine practiced by osteopathic physicians who graduate from accredited osteopathic medical schools in the United States. Osteopathy should only be used when referring to the occupation of osteopaths trained outside of the United States who do not qualify for licensure for the unlimited practice of medicine.

Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine is the proper name for the degree granted by osteopathic medical schools in the United States and is represented by the acronym DO. Do not use Doctor of Osteopathy. DO also may be used in place of osteopathic physician.

How should the DO designation be used?

Use the DO designation when referring to an osteopathic physician in the first reference:

  • Jane M. Jones, DO

State a DO’s specialty as:

  • Dr. Jane M. Jones, an osteopathic radiologist
  • Dr. James A. Rodriguez, an osteopathic pediatrician

Hold more than one professional degree? Use:

  • Jane M. Jones, DO, PhD
  • James A. Rodriguez, DO, MPH

Use the terms family medicine and family physician instead of general practice and general practitioner.

How should osteopathic medical schools be referenced?

Refer to osteopathic medical schools with their osteopathic identification:

  • New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine
What are the education, training, and licensure requirements for DOs?

Like MDs, DOs complete four years of medical school, followed by post-graduate training that may include an internship, residency and fellowship.  Physicians licensed as DOs, like their MD counterparts, must pass a stringent national medical board examination and complete post-graduate training in order to be eligible for state licensure. DOs and MDs may also become board-certified in the practice of their medical specialty.

What makes DOs different from MDs?

One way in which DOs are distinct from MDs is they receive an additional 200 hours of training in osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM). Through their training, DOs come to understand the body’s musculoskeletal system, an interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones.

DOs partner with patients to help them get healthy and stay well. They take a whole-person approach to treatment and care, focusing on disease prevention. DOs practicing OMM provide diagnosis and treatment through a system of techniques that also help alleviate pain, restore motion, and support the body’s structure to help it function more efficiently.


View the AOA’s annual Osteopathic Medical Profession (OMP) report for more information and current data on osteopathic medicine.

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